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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
will be flown to labs in paris, geneva, and moscow for testing. >> palestinian officials say they would petition the international criminal court if the investigation in the yielded prove that arafat was poisoned -- yielded proof that arafat was poisoned. >> after the sample was taken, the tomb was resealed. palestinian officials paid respects while an honor guard stood outside the mausoleum. a panel of experts at about their work behind blue drapes, taking tissue samples from the body of the former palestinian president, who died eight years ago in paris. his death has been the subject of rumors and conspiracy theories ever since. over the summer, his widow had his clothing examine, revealing traces of highly poisonous polonium 210. she filed charges for murder. most palestinians take it as a given that israel is responsible. for them, the only question is which poison was used. >> i am sending a question to all the world to help us determine the truth in the killing of yasir arafat. i hope that exhuming yasser arafat's body today will reveal the truth, and we will know the circumstances of the
, think about paris. cnn's alina cho tells us why in this week's travel insider. >> reporter: i lived in paris during college, so going back always brings back memories. one of my favorite things to do, then and now, sit outside and sip espresso or a glass of wine at a cafe. the french invented the concept. cafe de flore is my pick. and for dinner, across the street is also great. if you've never been to paris, take an afternoon on a sunny day and ride this boat. they are open air and allow you to see the entire city by sea. for the arts, this museum houses spectacular murals by monet. for shopping head to avenue montaigne, the madison avenue of paris. then, grab your walking shoes, walking all the way up and back down is a great way to work off a meal. and speaking of food, don't forget to buy a real baguette sandwich, or a crepe on the street. soon you'll feel like a native. alina cho, cnn, paris. >>> how old is the big blue planet that we're all living on right now? 10,000 years old? or 4.5 billion years old? the one and only bill nye the science guy will tell us what he thinks. at
in paris. a documentary by the tv network al jazeera prompted investigators to reopen his case. it said traces of highly toxic radioactive pu loan you mean had been detected on arafat's clothing and other personal belongings and even to this day the cause of arafat's death has not been determined. some palestinians claim he was assassinated by israel. israeli officials deny the claim. >> translator: the palestinians are confident that israel is behind the whole thing. we need to prove this to the rest of the world. >> experts from a swiss laboratory and others will conduct a detailed examination of the samples. they will take several months to conclude and clear up questions of arafat's death. palestinian authorities are determined to get to the bottom of this mystery. nhk world, ramallah. >>> delegates at the u.n. conference on climate change are trying to agree on what to do about global warming. it is becoming clear the climate for compromise has chilled. industrialized countries commitments to the protocol expire at the end of the year. delegates at the meeting in doha, qatar, are d
was seen in public he flew to a paris hospital age 75 and sick. three weeks later he was dead. why? his wife refused an autopsy. rumors flew, aids murdered, poisoned, that's what many palestinians believed. >> all the circumstantial evidence, all the political evidence indicate only one direction, which is mr. sharon. >> reporter: israel denies it. there was no real evidence he had been killed, until this year. the investigation was triggered by swiss technicians working with al jazeera tv. they examined arafat's toothbrush and hat and found traces of radioactive polonium 210. ten times more toxic than cyanide. the question now is, will they find it on his bones? >> the likelihood of being able to detect polonium 210 this long after contamination i think is very low. >> reporter: in that case, how did they find it on his clothes? the tests could raise more questions than it answers. yasser arafat, controversial in life, his death still a riddle. martin fletcher, nbc news, ramallah, the west bank. >>> in this country and parts of this area in fact, life remains at a cold dark standstill
homeric, i believe. >> rose: this is what he said in an interview with the paris review. "i have nothing to say about myself directly. i wouldn't know where to begin, in particular since i often look at myself in the mirror and say "whot the hell is that?" >> well, i think he probably had a pretty good idea of who have the hell that was. >> rose: and appreciation of who have the hell that was. >> yes, indeed. although he used mirrors as a metaphor for all kinds of -- i mean in a speech the last paragraph is all about when we look in the mirror. >> rose: is there something to be said or a reason to understand why he moved from poetry early in his life to prose later? >> i think he was always writing poetry and he continued to write poetry throughout the period of writing plays and prose. i think he ran out of gas for plays in the late 20th century but continued to write poetry and poetic prose up until his death. his love for antonia is an extraordinary and remarkable enduring testament to the power of adult relationships. >> rose: and scandalous in its beginning. >> scandalous from other
thing that has happened since paris hilton released her debut music album, and there is not a lot of hope for congress to resolve anything. >> but consumer confidence is at a file year high so it must translate into opening of the wallets? >>guest: that is a fair point but if you look at the most recent consumer sentiment survey, you talk about future expectations, they are lower when than the last few months, and the lower expectations are because of the fiscal cliff and because of the uncertainty that, althoughs in 2013. >> were you out there today? >>guest: i was. i was spending money trying to keep the economy going. also, buying all deals. i was not trading up to the high priced stuff. not yet. >> out are to have fun. thank you. so, another republican dixing a no tax hike pledge. does that mean tax hikes are coming? with verizon. hurry in this friday for great deals. like the droid razr by motorola in cranberry, free. or a white 7-inch samsung galaxy tab 2, just $99.99. this friday, get the best deals on the best devices on the best network. exclusively at verizon. and i'm he
died in a paris hospital almost exactly eight years ago after falling ill. his wife claimed he was a victim of polonium which can only be produced in lethal quantities by a state-run laboratory. a swiss lab found significant traces on arafat's underwear and toothbrush. his mausoleum screened from public view. three separatelyamples will be taken. the results of the investigation aren't expected for several months, but arafat's body will be immediately reburied with full military honors. not everybody is in favor of the exhumation. [ speaking in foreign language ] . >> reporter: palestinians are convinced israel is the culprit. what they really want to the know is who helped them? allen pizzey ramallah. >>> and former fbi assistant director joins us now. what do you make of this? >> this harkens back to the alexander case in london. the former kgb spy also poisoned with polonium 210. that was 2006. this was 2004. dropped in his tea by somebody he met at a hotel you and i have been to in the square. that also suggests if you look at the arafat case the amount of pr
he may have been poisoned by israel. a claim israel denies. he died in paris in 2004, a month after falling suddenly ill at his west bank compound. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] everyone deserves the gift of all day pain relief. this season, discover aleve. all day pain relief with just two pills. >>> the high financial cost of hurricane sandy is coming into focus. new york has requested $42 billion in aid and new jersey officials estimate they suffered at least $29 billion in losses, bringing the total of $71 billion in the two hardest hit states. sandy was in some ways worse than hurricane katrina, citing the high economic cost and property destruction. meanwhile, a top executive and a trustee for the power company have resigned in the wake of the company's slow response in getting power back to new yorkers on long island. >>> here's a look at some of the other stories topping the news right now. a fast-moving storm system sweeping through the mid-atlantic this morning bringing a wet mixture of rain and snow. the storm is expected to put down 1 to 3 inches of snow from west virginia
from princeton, moved to paris, and was falling in love with her new city and a new boyfriend. and her life was turned upside down. we'll speak with her in a moment, but first, here's her story. >> i was diagnosed in 2011 when i was 22. i remember as he said the words, i remember reading them on the paper and just feeling my heart sink down to my stomach. >> it just felt like something stopped inside of me. >> i lived in paris. i had an apartment there, a job there. my boyfriend was there. and suddenly i was in new york with a cancer diagnosis not knowing if i was going to survive the next few weeks. i got my first treatments with an incredible team of doctors. unfortunately, the second part of the biopsy results showed that i would need a bone marrow transplant. >> when i found out that i could donate my bone marrow, i felt like i could actually do something to help her. and hopefully save her. >> i feel very connected to him in this very intense way. >> we were incredibly elated about hearing the good news that adam was a match, not only a match, but a perfect match. >> there i was,
been paris. it might have been somewhere else, some say new york. where is it? >> i believe the food capital will be barcelona. i come from there, but my friend and mentor -- and you know him well -- sir ron aldria. >> he's at harvard teaching now. he's not cooking. >> i'm teaching at harvard too. still he has influence, hundreds of young chefs. barcelona, you go, and you will see the food capital of the world. >> what is it you mentioned national security in food. draw that connection for people who may not see it. >> for example, two years ago we had over 60 retired admirals and generals. they created an organization. they call it mission readiness. they are telling congress we need to start investing in food in the schools to start feeding children better, or the obesity rate in america, youngsters is going to be so high that the military isn't going to have enough americans to join the army. that's a national security issue. >> most people say to me, when you talk about food, we eat too much. we should enjoy good food, and it ought to be quality food, but we need to eat about hal
just been thrown out. >> reporter: by the time the air france concord lifted off from paris, its left wing was already on fire. it was july 25th, 2000. 109 passengers and crew had only minutes to live. the plane crashed into a hotel, killing four more people on the ground. turns out a 16-inch metal strip lying on the runway brought down the concord. >> when the concord went over it, it hit the tire to a point where it then exploded. parts of the tire then went up into the fuel tank like shrapnel. >> reporter: the flying debris exploded the concord's fuel tanks. the metal piece that triggered the accident had fallen off a continental dc-10 and had been mistakenly installed by a continental mechanic. >> this was an accident. why the french courts got involved and tried to make a criminal case out of this, i will never understand. >> reporter: french courts held continental airlines criminally responsible and convicted its mechanic of manslaughter. but now a french appeals court has overturned that ruling, saying the mistake made by the continental mechanic did not amount to a crime. the
as well as in washington and paris that algeria could be used to play a constructive role in this anticipated military intervention should it materialize. however, officials and observers within the region are -- [inaudible] and perhaps we can touch on some of this in the q&a. thank you. [applause] >> thank you very much. thank you very much, alexis, you helped us understand, perhaps, the dog that didn't bark and perhaps gave us a framework for understanding whether that'll be true in the future, and you laid out really an uncertain path ahead and helped illuminate the inner relationship between domestic politics and regional security concern. we'll wrap our panel here with two overviews, um, the first provided by dr. paul sullivan who also joined us for the last panel. dr. sullivan is going to give us an economic sort of toward the horizon of the region and help us understand some of the sparks that help drive change and may yet derail it. dr. sullivan? >> well, i'm not sure i would agree that that dog may not bark sometime in the future. algeria had its problems in the e
in jerusalem. again, you just returned from paris and you say much of the talk was about what's going on in the middle east. >> absolutely. the group i was with was john bolton and it was quite a group of the we were talking about the iranian group that wants to see regime change in iran. they've just been delisted. and the reality is that's an option that we should be talking about. there are three option. option number one is negotiate and do some kind of detante like question with the soviets. two, is military attacks. both of those are bad. the third is, let's see if you can get a different regime. after all, we have a different regime in egypt. we have a new one in libya. we're going to have a new one in syria. a lot of questions about what's going to replace them. in iran, you probably could replace them with a pretty solid pro-western government if you did the right things. >> brian: kind of encouraged that president obama said he does have words of support for israel. >> they're getting bombed every day. and it turns out this has been going on for some time of the two, three a
hurtphd in paris. and elizabeth lower-basch got her master's at harvard. william is an independent from massachusetts, you are on. caller: happy thanksgiving. i just want to know, what is poverty in america? what does that mean? host: we discussed that earlier. guest: $20,000 a year, $30,000, $50,000? are these companies sitting on millions of dollars? the governmentwhy are they sitts money when they could be hiring people? host: veronique de rugy, the figure that we decided on for a family of three? guest: $18,000 for a family of four. but a lot of the programs, the poverty programs -- and there are 126 different poverty programs, 22 different food programs, and people always assume there are a few. there are many of them. the eligibility depends on -- food stamps at the federal level are 30%, right? states can add to that number, so it really varies, your eligibility varies on the program, based on the federal standards, and the states once. host: would you like to address the caller's issues about u.s. corporations? guest: when we see surveys of companies, they are nervous about cons
wagner. she can now add another title to all of her big wins. just won the grand prix of france in paris this weekend. good morning to you. >> good morning. thank you so much. >> what a season you've had already. win after win. national championship, skate america, the four continents and most recently the grand prix of france so it must be just blowing you away. >> you know, it's been a dream season. i'm so proud-of-everything that i've accomplished so far, and, you know, all this hard work that i've put in is really starting to pay off so i'm on cloud nine. >> called yourself the almost girl and consider calling yourself the it girl. >> i think i've finally gotten rid of that. no longer feel like the almost girl. can i say i've gotten rid of that title and i'm now the it girl so i'm excited. >> you are skating in a holiday special this week. >> pandora holiday members on ice, great skaters, joanie rochette and brian boitano and it's a holiday weekend on nbc. >> you'll be skating to the classic "joy to the world." i will take your beautiful jacket. thank you. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪
but a legend over in europe when he went to germany he was a rock star, ireland, england, paris. they really loved his character j.r. from dallas. iconic. >> the cowboy icon. >> yeah. >> it's nice that he was able to die surrounded by friends in dallas. >> that's great. let's get to rick reichmuth. >> he was in the new dallas, too wasn't he? >> yes he was a reboot on tnt. >> he and the other guy that popped up on there? >> yes. played his father. >> two original cast members. >> you have got about a minute and a half to find out. >> i just gave myself a minute and a half for this weather. never happen. minus 2 this morning in international falls. incredibly cold. we are sending alli there after the show she loves it 12 degrees in minneapolis. cold is moving in behind the cold front. we have got temperatures certainly cooled down here. 15, 20 degrees for a lot of people. so, get ready for that. it will warm up a little bit and this isn't certainly the worst of it another batch of cold air will move in. most of it is across the far northern plains. behind this front, clear skies cooler eastern
society debut at crillon ball in paris. she's every bit the great-niece of jfk, who at the same age worked at the american embassy in london, traveled through south america and received a purple heart for his valor during the navy during world war ii. no purple heart for kick, but "town & country" says she is the niece that jackie would have loved. >> i think so. and lindsay lohan wasn't available. so we had to go with what we could get. >> had to go there. >> just kidding. yeah, i think she's great. i have to commend your pronunciation of the crillon ball. impressive for a guy from alabama. >> i try to go there at least every other year. >> kick is great. i think we're at a moment where the kennedys keep on coming at you. joe iii is back in congress taking over barney frank's seat. kick is emerging in a little different vein as a kennedy who doesn't really want to go into politics but is spending most of her time in l.a. and working for her father's cause with clean water. >> she's out of the family business. >> it looks like it. you know, they always seem to get sucked back in. so she st
deal does get done after the third round of talks right now it looks like london and paris are in the green as is frankfurt. our road map starts in omaha where conagra is buying ralcorp. a deal worth 6.8 billion including debt makes it the largest private label food manufacturer. has it lit a fire under m & a? >> don't come in with a negative attitude when i'm positive. >> we want to talk about the wave of special dividends. it continues. this time las vegas sands and dillard's, nearly 60 payments pulling payments forward ahead of tax changes next year. the question is who's next? >> greece gets the bailout payment as the eu and imf agree on terms of debt sustainability. where does it leave the greek economy which has already shrunk by nearly a fifth? >>> and warren buffett on tv this morning saying he wouldn't sell a single share of stock even if he was guaranteed the u.s. goes off the fiscal cliff. just wait until you hear who he thinks should be the treasury secretary. >> we'll begin of course with the deal of the day. conagra foods has agreed to acquire ralcorp for $5 b
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)